PUSH DOWN OPTIMISATION

                                                             

You can push transformation logic to the source or target database using pushdown optimization. When you run a session configured for pushdown optimization, the Integration Service translates the transformation logic into SQL queries and sends the SQL queries to the database. The source or target database executes the SQL queries to process the transformations.

The amount of transformation logic you can push to the database depends on the database, transformation logic, and mapping and session configuration. The Integration Service processes all transformation logic that it cannot push to a database.

Use the Pushdown Optimization Viewer to preview the SQL statements and mapping logic that the Integration Service can push to the source or target database. You can also use the Pushdown Optimization Viewer to view the messages related to pushdown optimization.

The following figure shows a mapping containing transformation logic that can be pushed to the source database:

clip_image002

This mapping contains an Expression transformation that creates an item ID based on the store number 5419 and the item ID from the source. To push the transformation logic to the database, the Integration Service generates the following SQL statement:

INSERT INTO T_ITEMS(ITEM_ID, ITEM_NAME, ITEM_DESC) SELECT CAST((CASE WHEN 5419 IS NULL THEN '' ELSE 5419 END) + '_' + (CASE WHEN ITEMS.ITEM_ID IS NULL THEN '' ELSE ITEMS.ITEM_ID END) AS INTEGER), ITEMS.ITEM_NAME, ITEMS.ITEM_DESC FROM ITEMS2 ITEMS

The Integration Service generates an INSERT SELECT statement to retrieve the ID, name, and description values from the source table, create new item IDs, and insert the values into the ITEM_ID, ITEM_NAME, and ITEM_DESC columns in the target table. It concatenates the store number 5419, an underscore, and the original ITEM ID to get the new item ID.

Pushdown Optimization Types

You can configure the following types of pushdown optimization:

  • Source-side pushdown optimization. The Integration Service pushes as much transformation logic as possible to the source database.
  • Target-side pushdown optimization. The Integration Service pushes as much transformation logic as possible to the target database.
  • Full pushdown optimization. The Integration Service attempts to push all transformation logic to the target database. If the Integration Service cannot push all transformation logic to the database, it performs both source-side and target-side pushdown optimization.

Running Source-Side Pushdown Optimization Sessions

When you run a session configured for source-side pushdown optimization, the Integration Service analyzes the mapping from the source to the target or until it reaches a downstream transformation it cannot push to the source database.

The Integration Service generates and executes a SELECT statement based on the transformation logic for each transformation it can push to the database. Then, it reads the results of this SQL query and processes the remaining transformations.

Running Target-Side Pushdown Optimization Sessions

When you run a session configured for target-side pushdown optimization, the Integration Service analyzes the mapping from the target to the source or until it reaches an upstream transformation it cannot push to the target database. It generates an INSERT, DELETE, or UPDATE statement based on the transformation logic for each transformation it can push to the target database. The Integration Service processes the transformation logic up to the point that it can push the transformation logic to the database. Then, it executes the generated SQL on the Target database.

Running Full Pushdown Optimization Sessions

To use full pushdown optimization, the source and target databases must be in the same relational database management system. When you run a session configured for full pushdown optimization, the Integration Service analyzes the mapping from the source to the target or until it reaches a downstream transformation it cannot push to the target database. It generates and executes SQL statements against the source or target based on the transformation logic it can push to the database.

When you run a session with large quantities of data and full pushdown optimization, the database server must run a long transaction. Consider the following database performance issues when you generate a long transaction:

  • A long transaction uses more database resources.
  • A long transaction locks the database for longer periods of time. This reduces database concurrency and increases the likelihood of deadlock.
  • A long transaction increases the likelihood of an unexpected event. To minimize database performance issues for long transactions, consider using source-side or target-side pushdown optimization.

Rules and Guidelines for Functions in Pushdown Optimization

Use the following rules and guidelines when pushing functions to a database:

  • If you use ADD_TO_DATE in transformation logic to change days, hours, minutes, or seconds, you cannot push the function to a Teradata database.
  • When you push LAST_DAY () to Oracle, Oracle returns the date up to the second. If the input date contains sub seconds, Oracle trims the date to the second.
  • When you push LTRIM, RTRIM, or SOUNDEX to a database, the database treats the argument (' ') as NULL, but the Integration Service treats the argument (' ') as spaces.
  • An IBM DB2 database and the Integration Service produce different results for STDDEV and VARIANCE. IBM DB2 uses a different algorithm than other databases to calculate STDDEV and VARIANCE.
  • When you push SYSDATE or SYSTIMESTAMP to the database, the database server returns the timestamp in the time zone of the database server, not the Integration Service.
  • If you push SYSTIMESTAMP to an IBM DB2 or a Sybase database, and you specify the format for SYSTIMESTAMP, the database ignores the format and returns the complete time stamp.
  • You can push SYSTIMESTAMP (‘SS’) to a Netezza database, but not SYSTIMESTAMP (‘MS’) or SYSTIMESTAMP (‘US’).
  • When you push TO_CHAR (DATE) or TO_DATE () to Netezza, dates with sub second precision must be in the YYYY-MM-DD HH24: MI: SS.US format. If the format is different, the Integration Service does not push the function to Netezza.

Reactions:
 
You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response.
0 Responses
Leave a Reply

Recent Comments